A little or a few money

We can use. Do you have a few dollars or a little money? On the other hand, . When we say 'a little' or 'a few', we mean a small amount, but it's enough: John: Let's go out tonight. Lucy: Okay. I have a little money, enough for the cinema at least. Money can enrich our lives and put us into a position to enrich others. If we use our money smartly. Money is an essential aspect of life that we can’t take for granted in the society we live in today. Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or. “A little money” is correct, but “few” is not. Ex - He spends a little money on his clothes. (i. 1)Little = not much (i.e., hardly any). Thus, the adjective little has a negative meaning. ‘A little’ has a positive meaning. 3) The little = not much, but all there is. Ex - He spends little money 2) A little = some though not much. Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or “grains of sand”; the adjective “few” is only used when the noun modified can be specifically enumerated (e.g., two dollars, 73 dollars, dollars, etc.). “A little money” is correct, but “few” is not. “A few money” is not correct (no matter how much . After “a few” you need a plural. You could say “I still have a few dollars.” That would be correct (as long as you really have a few dollars). abc-baltin.de › content › grammar-rules › adjectives › few-vs-. Today, that may sound like something only a pirate would do, but gold and silver coins were the norm until just. When was the last time you used a gold coin to purchase something — if you have at all?

  • Lucy: Sorry, I have little money. I really can't afford to go out. Of course, if we use 'few' or 'little' with a noun that we don't want, then it can have a positive meaning. If the noun is something that we want (like money or friends) then using 'little' or 'few' means that we don't have enough: John: Let's go out tonight.
  • They have slightly different meanings. ('A lot' and 'lots' aren't like this. a little a few a lot (of) We also use 'no article' with several: little few lots (of) In many situations, we can choose to use 'a little' or 'little' (when using an uncountable noun) or 'a few' or 'few' (when using a plural countable noun). - I need some money. - I need a few = some few = hardly any Example: A . A Little / A few or Little / Few a little = some little = hardly any Example: I need a little money. I need little money. Dur. The six characteristics of money are durability, portability, acceptability, limited supply, divisibility and uniformity. Money acts as a unit of account, a medium of exchange and a store of value. Jesse has a few speeding tickets, so his insurance rate is higher than mine. Examples for a little / a few. There were a few horses grazing in front of the barn. I always enjoy a little cream and sugar in my coffee. Have a little salsa on your eggs. We have a little extra time this afternoon; do you want to watch a movie? For example: I have coffee with a little milk. A Little / A Few Rule Use for non-countable nouns (e.g., jam, time). Examples for a little / a few I always enjoy a little cream and sugar in my coffee. Use a few if the noun is countable (e.g., jars of jam, students). She likes a few songs by Frank Sinatra. Few refers to countable nouns, . Rule Little refers to non-countable nouns, and is used with the singular form to indicate that something exists only in a small amount or to a slight degree. Few. Little refers to non-countable nouns, and is used with the singular form to indicate that something exists only in a small amount or to a slight degree. If a noun is in singular, we use a little. If a noun is in plural, we use a few. The expressions a little and a few mean some. Example: a little money. Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or “grains of sand”; the adjective “few” is only used. a little = some little = hardly any Example: I need a little money. A Little / A few or Little / Few. It's a difference if you use a little / a few or little / few. I need little money. Without the article, the words have a limiting or negative meaning. a few = some few = hardly any Example: A few friends visited me. - I need some money. - I need hardly any money. “A few money” is not correct (no matter how much money you have). After “a little” you need a mass noun. “I still have a little money” is correct (as long as you really have it). Kyle Taylor. You could say “I still have a few dollars.” That would be correct (as long as you really have a few dollars). After “a few” you need a plural. It means some or a small amount, such as, “I have a little money.”, “He made a little . There is a difference in meaning between “a little” and “little”. The meaning of “ a little” is positive. For example: I've got little money left in my. Few refers to countable nouns, and is used with the plural form to indicate not many persons or things. Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or “grains of sand”; the adjective “few” is only used when the noun modified can be specifically enumerated (e.g., two dollars, 73 dollars, dollars, etc.). “A little money” is correct, but “few” is not. Countable nouns have a singular and a plural form. In plural, these nouns can be used with a number (that's why they are called 'countable nouns'). a little money If a noun is in plural, we use a few Example: a few friends Countable / Uncountable Nouns In connection with a little / a few people often speak of countable nouns and uncountable nouns. A: Have you got any money? Yes, a little. some, a small amount. Some examples from the web: I have only a few minutes to finish. Madam President. 1,,, results on the web. I have only a few money left with me. We use a few with plural countable nouns: Mary said nothing, but she drank some tea and ate a. 6 days ago We use a little with singular uncountable nouns. Little, a little, few, a few - English Grammar Today - a reference to written and spoken. Compare A little, a few with a noun We use a little with singular uncountable nouns. (A) little and (a) few are quantifiers meaning ‘some’. Little and few have negative meanings. We use a few with plural countable nouns. We use them to mean ‘not as much as may be expected or wished for’. A little and (very) little are used with uncountable nouns (money, bread, water) · A few and (very) few are used with countable nouns (friends, tables. Example: a little money · If a noun is in plural, we use a few. Example: a few friends. A Little / A Few · If a noun is in singular, we use a little.
  • A little or a few money
  • A few is used with countable nouns (= some; not many) A little is used with. We use a few and a little to suggest a small quantity or not much of something. The question would be "how many Euros, not how much Euros.". Actually, it is few. Although the word "money" is not countable, Euros are. For example: I’ve got little money left in my account. Rule Little refers to non-countable nouns, and is used with the singular form to indicate that something exists only in a small amount or to a slight degree. Ben has few friends in London. Few refers to countable nouns, and is used with the plural form to indicate not many persons or things. We can use "a few" with count nouns and "a little" with noncount nouns. Here's a helpful #AmericanEnglish. Do you have a few dollars or a little money? He has a few dollars left. Examples: A few students of our school know this. a little: non countable nouns (milk, marmalade, money, time etc.) a few: countable nouns (bottles of milk, jars of marmalade, dollars, minutes etc.) Examples: He has a little money left. We use few and little without the article a to point out a more negative meaning. (Countable noun); They don't have much money to buy a present. Much is used with uncountable nouns. I don't have many CDs in my collection.