A few or a little money

We can use. Do you have a few dollars or a little money? Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or “grains of sand”; the adjective “few” is only . “A little money” is correct, but “few” is not. If we use our money smartly. Money is an essential aspect of life that we can’t take for granted in the society we live in today. Money can enrich our lives and put us into a position to enrich others. As with all mass (as opposed to count) nouns. 'Cash' is the same. 'Note' (or 'bill' if you. Definitely 'little money'. Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or “grains of sand”; the adjective “few” is only used when the noun modified can be specifically enumerated (e.g., two dollars, 73 dollars, dollars, etc.). “A little money” is correct, but “few” is not. Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or “grains of sand”; the adjective “few” is only used when the noun modified can be specifically enumerated (e.g., two dollars, 73 dollars, dollars, etc.). “A little money” is correct, but “few” is not. For example: I have coffee with a little milk. She likes a . Use a few if the noun is countable (e.g., jars of jam, students). A Little / A Few Rule Use for non-countable nouns (e.g., jam, time). abc-baltin.de › content › grammar-rules › adjectives › few-vs-. Today, that may sound like something only a pirate would do, but gold and silver coins were the norm until just. When was the last time you used a gold coin to purchase something — if you have at all?

  • 'A lot' means the same as 'lots'). little few lots (of) In many situations, we can choose to use 'a little' or 'little' (when using an uncountable noun) or 'a few' or 'few' (when using a plural countable noun). They have slightly different meanings. ('A lot' and 'lots' aren't like this.
  • I really can't afford to go out. If the noun is something that we want (like money or friends) then using 'little' or 'few' means that we don't have enough: John: Let's go out tonight. Of course, if we use 'few' or 'little' with a noun that we don't want, then it can have a positive meaning. Lucy: Sorry, I have little money. Little and few have negative meanings. We use them to mean ‘not as much as may be expected or wished for’. Compare A little, a . (A) little and (a) few are quantifiers meaning ‘some’. Dur. The six characteristics of money are durability, portability, acceptability, limited supply, divisibility and uniformity. Money acts as a unit of account, a medium of exchange and a store of value. Examples for a little / a few I always enjoy a little cream and sugar in my coffee. For example: I have coffee with a little milk. She likes a few songs by Frank Sinatra. A Little / A Few Rule Use for non-countable nouns (e.g., jam, time). Use a few if the noun is countable (e.g., jars of jam, students). I always enjoy a little cream and sugar in my coffee. We have a little extra time this afternoon; do you want to watch a movie? Examples for a little / a few. There were a few horses grazing in front of the barn. Have a little salsa on your eggs. Jesse has a few speeding tickets, so his insurance rate is higher than mine. There is a difference in meaning between “a little” and “little”. It means some or a small amount, such as, “I have a little money.”, “He made . 7 Answers. The meaning of “ a little” is positive. For example: I've got little money left in my account. Few refers to countable nouns, and is used with the plural form to indicate not many persons or things. Example: a little money · If a noun is in plural, we use a few. Example: a few friends. If a noun is in singular, we use a little. As with all mass (as opposed to count) nouns. 'Cash' is the same. 'Note' (or 'bill' if you. Oct 10, Definitely 'little money'. Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or “grains of sand”; the adjective “few” is only used when the noun modified can be specifically enumerated (e.g., two dollars, 73 dollars, dollars, etc.). Sponsored by Grammarly. “A little money” is correct, but “few” is not. a little = some little = hardly any. 3 money a little money. Without the article, the words have a limiting or negative meaning. Note: Of course you can count money but then you would name the currency and say that you have got 3 euro (but not 3 money). A Little / A few or Little / Few. It's a difference if you use a little / a few or little / few. For example: I've got little money left in my. Few refers to countable nouns, and is used with the plural form to indicate not many persons or things. Very few of her friends attended her bridal shower. little money. "Few" is a pronoun which is often translated as "pocos", and "little money" is a phrase which is often translated as "poco dinero". Muy pocas de sus amigas asistieron a su despedida de novia. Learn more about the difference between "few" and "little money" below. Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or “grains of sand”; the adjective “few” is only used when the noun modified can be specifically enumerated (e.g., two dollars, 73 dollars, dollars, etc.). Sponsored by Grammarly. “A little money” is correct, but “few” is not. Little and few have negative meanings. We use them to mean 'not as much as may be. (A) little and (a) few are quantifiers meaning 'some'. The word a little is used with uncountable noun means not enough and a few is used with countable noun. 8 yrs Report. The sentence is absolutely correct. We use a few with plural countable nouns: Mary said nothing, but she drank some tea and ate a. 6 days ago We use a little with singular uncountable nouns. Very few of her friends attended her bridal shower. Learn more about the difference between "few" and "little money" below. little money. Muy pocas de sus amigas asistieron a su despedida de novia. "Few" is a pronoun which is often translated as "pocos", and "little money" is a phrase which is often translated as "poco dinero". "Few" is a pronoun which is often translated as "pocos", and "little money" is a phrase which is often translated as "poco dinero". fyu. few . QUICK ANSWER. Learn more about the difference between "few" and "little money" below. Although the word "money" is not countable, Euros are. The question would be "how many Euros, not how much Euros.". Actually, it is few. Example: a few friends. A Little / A Few · If a noun is in singular, we use a little. Example: a little money · If a noun is in plural, we use a few. Money is a collective noun (like sand, dirt, sugar) as opposed to “dollars” or coins” or cent pieces” or “grains of sand”; the adjective “few” is only used when the noun modified can be specifically enumerated (e.g., two dollars, 73 dollars, dollars, etc.). “A little money” is correct, but “few” is not.
  • A few or a little money
  • We can use "a few" with count nouns and "a little" with noncount nouns. Here's a helpful #AmericanEnglish. Do you have a few dollars or a little money? a little = less than some but more than none He put a little sugar in his coffee. The only difference is a little and little are used with uncountable nouns (e.g. Little: An Example. He had little experience working with children, so he was not hired. sugar, money, stress). little = not much We have little time, so let's start working. A Little vs. Have a little money to get dressed by oneself. I have a little money, but this wasn't the agreement. If you need it I have a little money in my bag. Little, a little, few, a few - English Grammar Today - a reference to written and spoken. I have very little money. I have a little money. The word little can. I have a little bit of money. Yes, it is correct to say, "I have little money." 1. 2. 3. There were only a few people interested in the excursion so it was cancelled. It is also used for emphasis with very. However ‘only a few’ can mean not enough. Jul 13, · A few is used with too to mean just slightly more than enough. Very few people enjoyed the film despite the stars who act in it. Few means hardly any and usually has a negative meaning. He has a few dollars left. A few students of our school know this. a little: non countable nouns (milk, marmalade, money, time etc.) a few: countable nouns (bottles of milk, jars of marmalade, dollars, minutes etc.) He has a little money left. We use few and little without the article a to point out a more negative meaning. We use (a) few before plural (countable) nouns and (a) little or a bit of (more informal) before uncountable nouns in affirmative, negative and.